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NCRTC aligns Meerut Metro with regional rail transit

Earlier, as per Meerut Metro Detailed Project Report (DPR), the original estimated cost for Corridor I from Partapur to Modipuram was Rs 8,388 crore.

PTI|
Updated: Feb 24, 2018, 06.03 PM IST
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It will not only help the government save over Rs 6,300 crore but also decongest the heavy road traffic on the 90-km stretch between Delhi and Meerut.
NEW DELHI: The National Capital Regional Transport Corporation (NCRTC) has aligned Meerut Metro's North-South Corridor with RRTS network of Delhi-Ghaziabad-Meerut that will save Rs 6,300 crore of the public exchequer.

Earlier, as per Meerut Metro Detailed Project Report (DPR), the original estimated cost for Corridor I from Partapur to Modipuram was Rs 8,388 crore.

"Under the new plan, since this Metro line is parallel to RRTS network of Delhi-Ghaziabad-Meerut Corridor, UP government has accepted the proposal of NCRTC, and asked it to run this metro line on RRTS ( Regional Rail Transit System) network itself by doing necessary modifications," NCRTC said in a release today.

NCRTC, which is the executing agency, will add six stations - Partapur, Rithani, Bramhapuri, Bhaisali, MES Colony and Daurli- on its existing alignment exclusively for metro operations in Meerut.

It will not only help the government save over Rs 6,300 crore but also decongest the heavy road traffic on the 90-km stretch between Delhi and Meerut, it said
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