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    64% kids don't appreciate online classes; B'luru, Mumbai parents skeptical about sending children to school, even if it is declared safe

    Synopsis

    Safety of their wards is the topmost priority for parents.

    iStock
    While most schools have successfully transitioned to online, the model is found to be less effective with over two-third of children preferring to learn in the classroom.
    School’s not out but in (doors) and the majority of parents are having none of it.

    A recent survey conducted by SP Robotic Works conducted over the months of July and August among 3600 parents and an equal number of children in the age group of 7-17 years, showed that 64% parents and children have no appreciation for online schooling.

    Skeptical about going back
    Safety of their wards is the topmost priority for parents. Parents from Bangalore, Mumbai, Hyderabad and mini-metros are skeptical about sending their children to school, even if it is declared safe, with 82-86% unwilling to take any risk with the children. However, Chennai and Kolkata are the only exceptions among the major cities where the ratio of parents that are willing to take chances with sending their children to school is higher than the national average.

    Online not as effective
    While most schools have successfully transitioned to online, the model is found to be less effective with over two-third of children preferring to learn in the classroom. Interestingly, children, as well as the parents in smaller cities and non-metros, seem to prefer online learning compared to those in metros, except Bangalore.

    While most schools have successfully transitioned to online, the model is found to be less effective with over two-third of children preferring to learn in the classroomiStock
    While most schools have successfully transitioned to online, the model is found to be less effective with over two-third of children preferring to learn in the classroom

    Still dreaming big
    Although school may be a challenge, it’s not put a damper on kids dreaming big. Amongst the choices for dream jobs, 15% of girls aspire to become entrepreneurs when they grow up, a higher percentage than boys. Entrepreneurship is second only to the fancy of becoming a doctor. According to a 2015 study by McKinsey Global Institute, India's GDP could rise by between 16-60% by 2025 if women participated equally with men in the economy. Projections show that this could mean a whopping $2.9 trillion added to the economy. If we can nurture this dream of school-going girls well India surely has a chance of becoming a $5 trillion economy by 2025.

    10% of children aged between 7-10 seem to have been bitten by the entrepreneurship bug and the number goes up to 17% in the 16-17 age group. From the data available, mini-metros and non-metros are more likely to produce entrepreneurs than metros.

    Coronavirus Can Get Children Worried: Here's How To Have The Talk

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    Corona Conversations

    In the wake of coronavirus, several schools and colleges have been shut in many parts of the world to contain the spread of COVID-19. As public awareness and conversations around the novel virus increase, the situation can get the children anxious and worried for their family members and friends.



    Parents, family members, teachers, healthcare professionals and trusted adults play a significant role in helping children make sense of what they hear in a way that is honest, accurate and minimise their fear or anxiety.



    Dr Sreenath Manikanti, Senior Consultant Neonatologist & HOD Fortis La Femme Hospital, Richmond Road, Bangalore shares a few tips to help make the corona conversation easier around children.


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