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Break the inbox clutter: Working professionals get 180 mails daily, and don't open 72 of them

Unnecessary forwarding of emails also adds to the inbox clutter situation.

, ET Bureau|
Oct 16, 2019, 06.52 PM IST
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51% of emails employees receive are group emails.
Trying to get in touch with someone via email? You may want to try something else...

Everyone has an email address, but not every email is being opened a new study by Hiver has reported. Email is certainly the fundamental method of communication for most companies. However, there are various discoveries from the Hiver State of Email report that demonstrates that we have started using Email in a way it was never meant to be.

The report states that an average employee receives close to 180 emails every day and 40% of them are not even opened. For emails that are opened, the reply rate is just 16%. The comprehensive report on email behaviour at the workplace highlights that a widespread misuse of email has led to unwanted inbox clutter.

Biggest culprit
The biggest contributor to email overload is group emails sent to shared inboxes or distribution lists (such as info@company.com). The report states that 51% of emails people receive are group emails. The problem is that every employee who is a part of that group receives a copy of each email — in their Primary inbox.

The report also throws light on irresponsible Cc'ing which has become a standard in virtually every email — for reasons ranging from keeping people updated on specific projects to account for their work with their managers. 8% of emails people receive are those they’re Cc’d on.

work-emails1_iStock
For emails that are opened, the reply rate is just 16 per cent.

“Email clearly remains an essential and popular way of communicating, but there are a number of findings from the Hiver State of Email report that indicates that it is broken and requires a significant rehaul,” said Niraj Rout, co-founder and CEO of Hiver.

“There is a disconnect in which people are sending more emails, yet opening and responding to fewer of them. The low response and read rates for Cc and forwarded emails demonstrate that while people want to use email as a collaboration tool, it was clearly not designed for it,” he added.

The data for this report was collated from almost 1,000 email accounts of employees from across companies. Hiver processed 3,00,000 email threads and 4.7 million emails.

The cc Overuse
Emails employees are cc’d on: they open 84% of them, but reply to only 19%

The forwarding problem
Of the emails forwarded to people: they open 70% of them but reply to only 20%

Email groups: Boon or bane?
Of the group emails: they open 57% of them, but reply to only 14%.


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Amazon plans to retrain nearly a third of its workers in the US. This is how you can reskill yourself to adapt to new markets. Adaptability is the order of the day. It’s important to ride along with the change so that you don’t get left behind. Amazon US is training 100,000 workers in new skills, such as machine learning and even nursing. Whether it’s recession, boredom or job insecurity that’s the cause, reskilling can only be a boon for your career. Take a look at how you can keep yourself updated in the ever-changing workforce:
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