The Economic Times
English EditionEnglish Editionहिन्दी
| E-Paper
Search
+

    The Joy Of Giving: These India Inc Bosses Are Donating Half Their Wealth

    , ET Bureau|
    Festival of Giving
    1/6

    Festival of Giving

    For some leaders, personal wealth doesn’t mean amassing a fortune for themselves, but creating a legacy of giving back to society and to causes they hold dear. That’s why these business leaders have decided to donate 50 per cent of their wealth. Their narratives are apt in a week that is celebrating the Festival of Giving.

    iStock
    Amit Chandra and Archana Chandra
    2/6

    Amit Chandra and Archana Chandra

    Amit Chandra, Founder, Bain Capital India Office and Archana Chandra, CEO, Jai Vakeel Foundation

    “Archana and I have been donat ing a par t of our income since we got married, increasing it over the years. Our daughter was young when we took this decision, but we took her into confidence as she grew up. She wants to build her own life and appreciates what we are blessed with is being used for the greater good of society. Archana cares about intellectual disability and I am focused on sustainable rural development, given that it impacts millions.”

    Agencies
    Luis Miranda and Fiona Dias Miranda
    3/6

    Luis Miranda and Fiona Dias Miranda

    Luis Miranda, Chairman, Indian School of Public Policy, and Fiona Dias Miranda, director, 17000 Ft

    “When Amit Chandra asked if we would sign up for #LivingMyPromise, we immediately agreed, subject to our kids’ approvals. We discussed this with them, because they are the ones who are giving away something — a significant part of their inheritance. They immediately supported it and were clear that they don’t feel entitled. We again realised that we must have done something right bringing them up. We have our own preferred causes. We learn from each other’s experiences.”

    Agencies
    Gita Nayyar
    4/6

    Gita Nayyar

    Gita Nayyar, Board member/ senior advisor, Fulcrum Ventures Ltd

    “I always felt wealthy Indians should do a lot more for charity than what’s current ly being done. The wealth I created was largely due to the opportunities I was given. Many others, particularly women, are denied basic opportunities to achieve their potential. Causes linked to ensuring a more genderbalanced society are important, as well as issues of the aged/disabled who are ignored by society, and cancer support for women/girl child as I have seen this impact people close to me. The normal trappings of wealth don’t interest me. Sharing gives me greater satisfaction than accumulating things for myself.”

    Agencies
    Govind Iyer
    5/6

    Govind Iyer

    Govind Iyer, Partner, Egon Zehnder

    “After providing for my wi fe and kids to lead a reasonable life, I would like to do what I can to make the world a better place. I have three boys and they had di f ferent reactions. One even asked why not 100 per cent. Women’s empowerment i s a n i s sue that’s close to my heart. My mother was a gynaecologist and wanted every woman to realise their potential. My intent is to give as much as I can and see the impact before I turn 75. Accumulation of wealth is not a desirable goal. It’s important to realise that you come to this world to make an impact and leave with a legacy of good deeds.”

    Agencies
    Pramod Bhasin
    6/6

    Pramod Bhasin

    Pramod Bhasin, Chairman, Clix Capital

    “The a-ha moment came to me as I stood on the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange, having taken Genpact public in 2007. I realised that I had created more wealth for myself than I ever imagined. When a reporter asked what I was going to do with this wealth, I realised that I didn’t have a good answer. I discussed this with my partner and daughter who encouraged me. Two areas that I would like to explore are healthcare and legal reforms. They are special for no other reason than they hold our country back enormously.”

    Agencies
    The Economic Times
    X
    User