Never miss a great news story!
Get instant notifications from Economic Times
AllowNot now


You can switch off notifications anytime using browser settings.

The Miles That Made Milestones: Running Records Set By Eliud Kipchoge, Sergey Bubka

ET Bureau|
Free To Run
1/6

Free To Run

Eliud Kipchoge’s two-hour marathon run won’t count as an official record. But it was the first time a human achieved the feat. Here are some other landmarks from track and field events.

(Image: AP)

Agencies
Jim Hines
2/6

Jim Hines

Though it’s Bob Hayes who’s credited with running the first 100-metre dash in under 10 seconds — a 9.9 second sprint in 1963, this too was an unofficial timing. Hayes, who also broke the official world record at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, held the record for four years before fellow American runner Jim Hines improved it.

At the 1968 Mexico Olympics, Arkansas boy Hines ran 100 metres in 9.95 seconds, making it the new world record and the first time the 10-second mark was officially breached. Today, the record belongs to Usain Bolt who’s himself broken the record thrice, lowering it from 9.74s to 9.58s, which he ran at the world championships in Berlin in 2009.

(Image: AFP)

Agencies
Sergey Bubka
3/6

Sergey Bubka

In pole vault, a height ceiling of six metres (19 feet) was considered unattainable. Until Ukraine’s Sergey Bubka came along, setting numerous world records. In July 1985, he became the first man to clear six metres in Paris, while three years later, in 1988, he managed 6.06 metres. Between 1984 and 1988, Bubka had raised the world record by 21 centimetres, a greater gain in four years than what had been achieved in the previous 12. He continued breaking his own records until 1994, when he jumped 6.14 metres. This would stand for over 20 years, until 2014, when Frenchman Renaud Lavillenie jumped 6.16 metres, incidentally in Bubka’s native Donetsk, with the 51-year-old in attendance.

Getty Images
Eliud Kipchoge
4/6

Eliud Kipchoge

Kenyan runner Kipchoge last month became the first person to run a 42-kilometre marathon in under two hours, after he completed the distance in 1:59:40. This is considered among the most enduring of long-distance running accomplishments. To put this timing in perspective, he ran at an average speed of 4.35 minutes for a mile. And kept doing it over 26 times. However, the timing wouldn’t be counted as official. The event wasn’t a competition, and was held for Kipchoge alone. In addition, he was also assisted by a team of runners (pacekeepers). What time he might have run had it not been for them is anybody’s guess. However, the official world record for the fastest marathon does belong to the same Eliud Kipchoge, a 2:01:39 time he set at the 2018 Berlin Marathon.

(Image: AFP)

Agencies
Roger Bannister
5/6

Roger Bannister

The mile isn’t often considered in today’s metric athletics world as a unit denoting athletic supremacy, but it wasn’t always so. In the 1950s, the mile (1,600 metres) was considered the pinnacle and to run it under four minutes was considered nigh impossible.

Briton Roger Bannister, who had come fourth in the 1952 Olympics in the 1,500 metre run, got there first. He ran in 3:59.4, to break the world record at Iffley Road in Oxford and shatter the psychological ceiling. Six weeks later, John Landy brought it down to 3:58.0. By the end of the decade, it was down to 3:54.5, while the current record stands at 3:43.13, set by Hicham El Guerrouj in 1999.

Getty Images
Renate Stecher
6/6

Renate Stecher

On the women’s side of the draw, the 11-second mark for the 100-metre dash was considered unbreakable until as recently as 1973. It was East German sprinter Stecher who became the first woman to run a 10.9 second race. However, several of Stecher’s records would later come under a cloud, after it was revealed that East Germany conducted a statesponsored drug programme.

In fact, the drug menace would continue to plague women’s 100-metre running, as subsequent record holder Florence Griffith Joyner also faced doping allegations.

(Image: www.amazon.com)

Agencies
X
User

Other useful Links


Follow us on


Download et app


Copyright © 2019 Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd. All rights reserved. For reprint rights: Times Syndication Service