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    5 ways to help staff respond effectively to change

    ET Bureau|
    Drive communication
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    Drive communication

    Open and effective communication is essential at times of sudden change. “Driving transparency will ensure that rumours and false news don’t cause panic among employees, and also gives them the assurance that they are an equal part of the process,” said Pallavi Jha, managing director at Dale Carnegie of India.

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    Drive sensitisation
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    Drive sensitisation

    Managers should be sensitised about the change that has happened and its effects, and properly equipped to handle concerns, said Jha. “Leaders need to inspire employees by presenting a compelling vision for the future, as well as explaining the changes and why they are important,” said Rohit MA, co-founder, Cloudnine Group of Hospitals.

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    Provide training
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    Provide training

    Quite often, training is underutilised or not part of the strategy of managing change. “Training helps in the feedback cycle and can bring in varied inputs through engagement, and also provide vital insights into the effectiveness of such efforts,” said Rohit.

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    Spend time with employees
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    Spend time with employees

    Senior leaders must spend time on helping employees understand the need or reasoning behind any change and appreciate its magnitude. “Leaders must encourage collaboration and new ideas that can actually be turned into feasible initiatives,” said Udaiy Khanna, director of HR, Metro Cash & Carry, India.

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    Keep employees enthused
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    Keep employees enthused

    Advocating the right attitude towards the change is extremely important to ensure smooth transitions. “Senior leaders should take cognisance of on-ground challenges that employees face during implementation and keep them enthused throughout the transition phase. Regular and personal engagement with employees across levels will also help to keep them motivated,” said Khanna.

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