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    Tomar hails farm reforms, says farm laws revolutionary

    Synopsis

    “The three laws enacted by the government will free farmers from all unnecessary legal bindings and help them get maximum value for their produce. Farmers will be attracted toward planting high value crops. Whenever any reform is introduced, impediments are bound to come in the way,” Tomar said.

    PTI
    He said that the farm laws have been introduced after long deliberations with experts and stakeholders.
    New Delhi: A day before the scheduled meeting with protesting farmer unions, agriculture minister Narendra Singh Tomar, on Monday, hailed the farm reforms saying that these reforms will go a long way in elevating the living standard of farmers.

    “The three laws enacted by the government will free farmers from all unnecessary legal bindings and help them get maximum value for their produce. Farmers will be attracted toward planting high value crops. Whenever any reform is introduced, impediments are bound to come in the way,” Tomar said while addressing a national conference on farm reforms.

    He said that the farm laws have been introduced after long deliberations with experts and stakeholders.

    “These reforms were long overdue. But previous government could not muster courage to introduce these laws. Our government under the leadership of Prime Minister Narendra Modi brought revolution in agriculture sector,” he said.

    Dispelling rumours that system minimum support price (MSP) will be withdrawn, Tomar said that the government has strengthened the MSP system since 2014 when BJP came into power.

    “MSP system will exist in future also. In fact we have included pulses and oilseeds under MSP purchase. We have increased the MSP on 23 crops by implementing the recommendations of Swaminathan Commission,” he said.

    Tomar said that there is still imbalance in agriculture sector even as the country has achieved surplus production in food grains.

    “The condition of small and marginal farmers is different than large farmers. We have done a lot of work for linking small farmers with government schemes, subsidies, MSP, technology and market so that their earnings improve,” he said.

    The government has increased the agriculture budget by 5 times from Rs 27,000 crore in 2013-14 to Rs 1.34 lakh crore in the current fiscal.

    “We have allocated Rs 1 lakh crore for farm infrastructure development which will help attracting investment in rural sector. The direct fund transfer under PM KISAN scheme will make farmers self dependent and additional disbursement of Rs 1.57 lakh crore through KIsan Credit Cards has helped them meet input cost,” Tomar said.
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    4 Comments on this Story

    Subhash Arora46 days ago
    Act No 20,21,22 of 2020 are revolutionary to the extent they have brought Agro Labourers Farmers Revolution against anticipated control of Giant Corporates over Agriculture in violation of Article 39(b c) against concentration of wealth and means of production. All that glitters is not gold.Act No 22 is stabbing 135 crore Bhartiya Janta having Kumbhkarni Sleep over lifting ban on hoarding of Foodstuffs including Foodgrains, Pulses, Cooking Oil, Potatos, Onions, Oilseeds enabling Hoarding Corporates to restrict supply and increase prices leading to Spiral of Price Rise in other Goods and Services. Act No 21 finishes FCI, Ahrityas, Market Workers, Transporters. Act No 20 subordinates Farmer to Giant Corporate like his labour.
    Krishnan Avinjikkad46 days ago
    That Governments, both in states and the Centre have to often lean heavily on the already heavily-burdened, reportedly under-staffed Supreme Court on administrative, law and order matters speaks volumes about their inefficiency and incompetence. When confronted with issues like the new farm laws, their incapacity to deal with fellow mortals and grapple with the facts of life become pitifully plain.The farmers' strike has thus turned out to be a matter of utmost concern, threatening to be a law and order issue.. It cannot be denied that the Centre did not take the farmers into confidence before the legislation was passed. But there are certain factors too that cannot be refuted either. Farmers in Punjab, one of India's richest states, from the agriculture point of view, where the value of agricultural land hovers between an unbelievable 50 lakhs and 1.5 cr., - unheard of in other parts- are a different kettle of fish altogether. Eminent agriculture economist Ashok Gulati's tellingly breviloquent points succinctly sum up the issue: Punjab farmers get annual subsidies of Rs.8275 cr.,, averaging 1.22 lakh per household, in addition to subsidized credit, and under the Prime Minister's Kisan Saman Yojana, Rs.6000/- is being credited to each farmer's account. And the manner In which they have been conducting the agitation, the paraphernalia on the agitation cite is an average Indian farmer's envy! The epicentre of the struggle is Punjab, and it has taken a couple of months to exhort others, hitherto remaining unconcerned; it is beyond one's comprehension how states like Kerala, alien to Mandis and APMCs, have joined the bandwagon, albeit only as a token,; It is the self-appointed soi disant progressives, knowing precious little about the functioning of APMCs who are trying to steal the show. Their major issue of Minimum Support Price, a just one certainly, has found acceptance and it is imperative the farmers give up their egotistic stance and save the economy that's already in doldrums.
    Bhavan Kataria46 days ago
    Bhavan Kataria, we all are bored with same tune repeated by His Master's Voice!
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