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| 09 August, 2020, 02:02 AM IST | E-Paper
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    Global Warming

    Indian-origin scientist — who has a glacier named after him — to drill through Greenland ice to study effects of climate change

    Project Bags USD 7 Million Grant From US National Science Foundation

    Temperatures at Norway's Arctic archipelago hit record high

    Temperatures at Norway's Svalbard archipelago, about midway between the mainland and the North Pole, hit a record high of 21.7 degrees Celsius, Norway's Meteorological Institute said.For the second day in a row, the archipelago registered 21.2 degrees Celsius (70.2 Fahrenheit) of heat in the afternoon, just under the 21.3 degrees recorded in 1979, meteorologist Kristen Gislefoss told AFP.

    Portugal placed on wildfire alert as temperatures climb

    High temperatures in recent weeks have left many forested areas bone dry, and declaring a state of alert allows officials to place firefighting assets on standby for quick deployment.

    Wildfire in Greece rages for second day, more homes evacuated

    The Fire Service said the blaze to the east of the southern town of Corinth was in full development after winds picked up following a lull earlier in the day, and one more village was ordered evacuated - the seventh since the fire broke out on Wednesday.

    Sweden, a flawed climate awareness pioneer

    The sparsely populated country of about 10.3 million people experiences long nights and cold temperatures during winter months but produces electricity largely free of fossil fuels by combining nuclear power with renewable, mainly hydroelectric, energy.

    Climate change makes freak Siberian heat 600 times likelier

    International scientists released a study Wednesday that found the greenhouse effect multiplied the chance of the region's prolonged heat by at least 600 times, and maybe tens of thousands of times.

    Climate change makes Siberian heat 600 times likelier

    Nearly impossible without man-made global warming, this year's freak Siberian heat wave is producing climate change's most flagrant footprint of extreme weather.A study found that the greenhouse effect multiplied the chance of the region's prolonged heat by at least 600 times, and maybe tens of thousands of times.

    UN: World could hit 1.5-degree warming threshold in 5 years

    The World Meteorological Organization said there is a 20 per cent chance that the 1.5 C level will be reached in at least one year between 2020 and 2024. The period is expected to see annual average temperatures that are 0.91 C to 1.59 C higher than pre-industrial averages.

    UN: World could hit 1.5-degree warming threshold in 5 years

    The world could see average global temperatures 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 Fahrenheit) above the pre-industrial average for the first time in the coming five years, the UN weather agency said Thursday.

    UN forecasts even warmer temperatures over next 5 years

    UN forecasts even warmer temperatures over next 5 years

    The annual mean global temperature is likely to be at least one degree Celsius above pre-industrial levels in each of the next five years, the World Meteorological Organization said Thursday.​

    Climate change turning US mountain lakes green with algae

    Climate change turning US mountain lakes green with algae

    Global warming is turning clear mountain lakes green in the western United States because of an increase in algae blooms "without historical precedent", researchers reported on Tuesday.

    Siberian temperatures hit June record, fires spread: EU data

    Siberian temperatures hit June record, fires spread: EU data

    Temperatures in Arctic Siberia soared to a record average for June amid a heat wave that is stoking some of the worst wildfires the region has ever known. Global temperatures last month were on par with a 2019 record, and "exceptional warmth" was recorded over Arctic Siberia.

    Global CO2 emissions to drop 4-7% in 2020, but will it matter?

    Global CO2 emissions to drop 4-7% in 2020, but will it matter?

    In early April, coronavirus lockdowns led to a 17 percent reduction worldwide in carbon pollution compared to the same period last year, according to the first peer-reviewed assessment of the pandemic's impact on CO2 emissions, published in Nature Climate Change.

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