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    Trash to treasure: Everest garbage given new lease of life

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    Cleaning up the Everest
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    Cleaning up the Everest

    Community NGO Sagarmatha Pollution Control Committee, along with BW2V and other agencies, recently launched a campaign to transport waste to recycling centres by harnessing the roughly 50,000 trekkers and their guides who visit the region every year -- not all attempt the summit but many travel to base camp.

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    Govt organised clean-up camp
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    Govt organised clean-up camp

    After heavy criticism for the condition of one of its greatest natural resources, Nepal's government and mountaineering groups this year organised a six-week clean-up. Scaling almost 8,000 metres (26,300 feet) from base camp to the closest camp to the summit, a 14-strong team retrieved more than 10 tonnes of trash that was flown or driven to recycling centres in Kathmandu.

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    Warning!
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    Warning!

    But mountaineers warn that this year's clean-up collected just a fraction of Mount Everest's rubbish -- with the higher and harder to reach camps still littered by abandoned gear. Melting glaciers, caused by global warming, are revealing years-old waste but as the number of climbers attempting to summit soars so do the environmental challenges.

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