Never miss a great news story!
Get instant notifications from Economic Times
AllowNot now


You can switch off notifications anytime using browser settings.
11,937.5016.0
Stock Analysis, IPO, Mutual Funds, Bonds & More

Odisha’s maternal health scheme doing better: Survey

The Jaccha-Baccha Survey (JABS), conducted by student volunteers in June 2019, took place in six states—Chhattisgarh, Himachal Pradesh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Odisha and Uttar Pradesh. The findings of the survey were released in a report on Mo...

ET Bureau|
Updated: Nov 19, 2019, 09.43 AM IST
0Comments
Agencies
maternity-leave-agencies
The report noted that the Odisha government’s scheme ‘Mamata’ covered two children, not one, unlike the Centre’s Pradhan Mantri Matru Vandana Yojana.
NEW DELHI: Odisha’s eight-year-old state-run maternity scheme and focus on social development has put it ahead of other states in women and children's health indicators, a survey led by economists Jean Drèze, Reetika Khera and Anmol Somanchi shows.

The Jaccha-Baccha Survey (JABS), conducted by student volunteers in June 2019, took place in six states—Chhattisgarh, Himachal Pradesh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Odisha and Uttar Pradesh. The findings of the survey were released in a report on Monday.

In each state, the survey teams visited 10 to 12 randomly-selected ‘anganwadis’ and interviewed as many as possible of the 342 pregnant and 364 nursing women covered by the anganwadi scheme. The exercise revealed that Odisha, like Tamil Nadu—which has a separate state-run maternal benefits scheme—performed better on social indicators pertaining to health of women and children, as opposed to those that are fully dependant on the central government.

The report noted that the Odisha government’s scheme ‘Mamata’ covered two children, not one, unlike the Centre's ‘Pradhan Mantri Matru Vandana Yojana (PMMVY)’, and that the state performed much better in every respect of coverage—awareness levels, application rates, and actual benefits.

"Some states, notably Odisha, are now giving eggs as “take-home ration” (THR) to pregnant and nursing women. This is a good practice that should be replicated in all states," said the report.

The survey also noted that the reach of integrated child development services (ICDS) was relatively better in Odisha, with near-universal coverage of basic services (health checkup, tetanus injections, iron and folic acid tablets, food supplements, etc.) among pregnant and nursing women registered at the anganwadi.

Khera said states such as Odisha, Tamil Nadu had the advantage of state-run maternity schemes, and governments that have been committed to social development. She also flagged the use of the Centre's funds for buying smartphones for anganwadi workers. "Now, there seems to be a lot of focus on record-keeping, which really doesn't mean much. It is just a surveillance. States such as Gujarat which have been investing in smartphones for anganwadi workers have the worst results on this count."

The survey noted that six years after the National Food Security Act became law, several states are lagging in payment of maternal benefits to pregnant women.

The report said, "In Chhattisgarh and Odisha, we also found many signs of positive change, brightly painted anganwadis, breakfast for the kids, a pre-school education syllabus, collaboration between anganwadi and health workers, and eggs as THRs (in Odisha). It is in Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh and – especially – UP that the situation was absolutely dismal. Women and children disliked the “panjiri” (ready-to-eat mixture) being distributed in the anganwadis, if they ate it at all. No food was cooked at the anganwadi, even for children in the age group of 3-6 years. Pregnant women, left to their own devices, were struggling with the worst possible hardships and pains."

The survey noted "many signs of hope" in Chhattisgarh, as the state had made "sustained efforts to improve anganwadis and primary health care".

The laggard states, so to speak, were Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh and especially Uttar Pradesh, the report said, adding that in Madhya Pradesh, the picture was not all bleak – the “model” (aadarsh) anganwadis were relatively good, and that every nursing woman had delivered in a public institution and used a public ambulance.

Also Read

Odisha Slurry lenders pick ArcelorMittal bid

Aggressive bidding derails Odisha's iron ore auctions

Odisha’s distressed cold storage operators on strike

Odisha to work with IMF on multi-year budgeting system

Odisha bolts ahead in lightning stakes

Comments
Add Your Comments
Commenting feature is disabled in your country/region.
Download The Economic Times Business News App for the Latest News in Business, Sensex, Stock Market Updates & More.

Other useful Links


Follow us on


Download et app


Copyright © 2019 Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd. All rights reserved. For reprint rights: Times Syndication Service