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How AIIMS Trauma Centre handles 200-250 injured people daily

How AIIMS Trauma Centre handles 200-250 injured people daily
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How AIIMS Trauma Centre handles 200-250 injured people daily

Durgesh Nandan Jha, TNN

The AIIMS Trauma Centre gets 200-250 injured people daily. While many require only first aid, others have to be pulled back from the brink...

We take a look at how the facility remains geared up for any medical emergency:

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'Working in a trauma facility is hectic'
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'Working in a trauma facility is hectic'

It's a red, it's a red." The cry of a man dressed in navy blue uniform shatters the calm at the emergency desk of AIIMS Trauma Centre as he wheels in a 12-year-old. A group of doctors attending to other cases till now rush to the resuscitation bay. "It's a case of fall from height," shouts one of them.

Immediately, the patient is put on mechanical ventilation and is rushed to the operation theatre for emergency surgery after resuscitation. An hour later, a doctor comes out of the operation theatre and tells the family that blood accumulated in the abdomen has been cleared and the patient is stable.

"Working in a trauma facility is hectic, true, but it is gratifying also. We save lives of people who would die at once if timely medical support is not provided," said Dr Piyush Ranjan, a senior resident doctor.

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Started five years ago
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Started five years ago

The 178-bed trauma care facility that was started five years ago has handled disaster situations such as the Mehrauli blast in 2008 and the Delhi high court blast in 2011, among a host of others.

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How admissions are handled
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How admissions are handled

Official records show more than 56,000 trauma patients are brought to the trauma centre every year but only about 15,000 get admission. So how, does the hospital decide whom to admit?

Nirmal Thakur, the hospital spokesperson, said they have categorized injuries as life-threatening, dangerous but not immediately life-threatening, and wounds. The three categories are colour-coded red, yellow and green, respectively.

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Coding the patients
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Coding the patients

"Any patient who is unconscious and losing blood or who has severe head injury comes under code red. They are never refused admission. We take them to the resuscitation bay immediately and follow it up with necessary tests and surgeries. Code yellow patients are kept in observation for some time and the green ones are discharged after first aid," Thakur said.

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Most cases involve young people
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Most cases involve young people

Dr M C Misra, chief of the centre, said almost 40% of the cases involve young people injured in traffic accidents. "The other common causes of admission here are fall from height, assault and railway track accidents. Some patients are also referred from other states for better treatment," he said. Misra said more cases arrive on weekends and festivals like Holi.

"Normally we get about 200-250 cases daily. But on these days the numbers double. We get cases of drink driving and assault, among others," he added.

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gap between demand and supply
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gap between demand and supply

However, there remains a huge gap in demand and supply. Incidents of relatives manhandling doctors for not admitting their patient or allegedly overlooking one patient to look after another have been reported.

Recently, nursing coordinators have been appointed to deal with such cases. It has been seen that women are able to handle such situations better.

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New display boards with real-time updates
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New display boards with real-time updates

Display boards have been put across the corridor where all patients' details - their present condition and intervention required, are updated on real-time basis.

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Issue of referrals
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Issue of referrals

One major problem the centre faces is of referrals. Many private hospitals and even the government hospitals refer their patients without consulting with doctors here about the availability of beds.

There is an urgent need for the health ministry to come up with an inter-hospital referral and transfer policy.

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