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Dec 16, 2019, 01.51 AM IST

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India must enact stringent law to combat rapidly changing climate: Experts

With the chorus against climate change getting louder than ever, countries around the world, including India, have expressed their commitment towards reducing carbon emissions but environmental experts feel that targets will not be achieved effectively unless there is stringent legislation to deal with the issue.

India must enact stringent law to combat rapidly changing climate: Experts

Under the Paris Agreement, India pledged to reduce the emission in...

ET Prime Distribution
  • With discussions remaining deadlocked on how countries trade in carbon credits, finalisation of the draft text at the ongoing UN climate change conference (COP25) looked set to be dragged on to Saturday to allow this round of global parleys to arrive at an outcome.

    According to the International Resource Panel, emissions from the production of materials as a share of global greenhouse gas emissions increased to 23 per cent in 2015 from 15 per cent in 1995. More than half of the emissions from materials is from direct material production processes.

    Cariou, a researcher & professor at KEDGE Business School and a specialist in maritime and port economy suggests that decreasing ship’s speed seems to be the best short-term answer to meeting the initial deadline of 2030 for cutting.

    Maruti feels it would miss out on a sizeable market share if it leaves the space but its rivals stay put.

    Ursula von der Leyen, new president of the European Union's executive Commission, has laid out the details of her "European Green Deal" today, Wednesday, coinciding with a U.N. summit on the climate. Calling it "Europe's man on the moon moment," von der Leyen presented her plan to make the EU the world's first "climate-neutral" continent by 2050.

    As representatives of governments work to develop an international policy to tackle climate change at the ongoing UN climate talks in Madrid, there’s an effort to identify sectors and actions that help meet the goal. Tourism figures prominently in this list. For experts, tourism’s contribution to climate change presents a conundrum.

    India along with China, Brazil and a handful of developing countries are calling out developed countries for failing to meet the targets that had to be achieved by 2020. These countries have moved a proposal that will require industrialised countries to meet their obligations of reducing emissions, and to provide financial and tech support to developed nations.

    The study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, said the total emissions of the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO2), from human activities are set to reach almost 43 billion tonnes in 2019. The researchers said emissions in India are projected to rise by 1.8 per cent in 2019, considerably lower than in 2018, likely due to weaker growth.

    In its annual analysis of fossil fuel trends, the Global Carbon Project said CO2 emissions were on course to rise 0.6 percent this year -- slower than previous years but still a world away from what is needed to keep global warming in check.

    “The pre-2020 implementation gaps should not present an additional burden to developing countries in the post-2020 period,” the Indian government said in an official statement. India said if the developed countries fail to meet their Cancun pledges to reduce emissions by 2020, it would put additional pressure on the developing countries.

    The UN’s emission gap report released last week said the world is on track for a 3.6 degree C temperature increase, putting hundreds of millions of people at risk. Current global efforts to reduce carbon-dioxide emission are not sufficient to meet the goal set in Paris to restrict temperature rise to well below 2 degrees C.

    Despite the slowdown, global carbon dioxide emissions are projected to rise by 0.6 percent in 2019. This increase though substantially lower compared to the previous two years--1.5% in 2017 and 2.1% in 2018—is due to a robust growth in natural gas and oil use. Natural gas has been the dominant driver of global emissions since 2012.

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