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Maha reports 8,142 new COVID-19 cases

Total cases in the state rise to 16,17,658, including 42,633 deaths and 14,15,679 recovered patients. Active cases stand at 1,58,852.
The Economic Times
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| 22 October, 2020, 12:37 AM IST | E-Paper
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    SEARCHED FOR:IMMIGRATION

    View: Trump’s Immigration - Destruction, not disruption

    Trump nearly doubled the required investment amounts. Proponents correctly argue that the EB-5 program has garnered more than $20 billion in investments and has created more than 730,000 jobs between 2008 and 2015. How can any government oppose such a benificient tool?

    Trump versus Biden: Who will be better for India when it comes to immigration?

    It’s no surprise that immigration regulations will be much str...

    Trump ban on visas cost the US economy $100 billion: Study

    The June 22 Proclamation, which barred the entry of H-1B, L-1 and J1 visa holders ...

    • The policy tightens the definition of “specialty” occupations that qualify for H-1B status and prevents companies from hiring foreign workers unless they have degrees that precisely match available job postings — making it impossible to hire a worker with an engineering degree as a software programmer, for instance.

      Early this month, in its interim final rule, the Department of Homeland Security announced to narrow the definition of "specialty occupation" as Congress intended by closing the overbroad definition that allowed companies to game the system.

      Expect a continued attack on legal immigration. Don’t expect the President to ever take down the bans on non-immigrant and immigrant visas. And as the courts get more and more Trump-appointed judges, the use of presidential proclamations to ban even more groups will likely continue.

      The unemployment rate for individuals in computer occupations, which is what over 60% H-1B visas are issued for, changed from 3% in January (before the outbreak) to 3.5% in September, according to an analysis of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) Current Population Survey by the National Foundation for American Policy (NFAP).

      The USA was a destination for about a million international students last academic year – of which over 200,000 students are from India 3 – contributing to over $8bn to the US economy. It is now a well-known fact that the USA as the preferred destination for Indian students is declining over the past few years.

      The fate of the H-1B program still remains in doubt. The Department of Homeland Security has submitted a new regulation for federal review that would toughen H-1B eligibility and impose new obligations on the companies trying to bring in foreign workers.

      The US Senate has passed a continuing resolution bill, to avert an October 1 shutdown and fund the government until December 11. The Bill – HR 8337, enables US Citizenship and Immigration Services to (USCIS) to expand premium processing to cover new categories and also hike the fees in certain existing categories.

      Trump has promised a stricter work visa regime in a bid to create more jobs for American workers in a struggling economy. His rival Joe Biden, on the other hand, has vowed to restore a liberal work visa regime and expand employment-based visas that he says are critical for US businesses.

      Under the new rules, filing fees for H-1B high skill visas would increase by 21% to $555 and those for L1 visas by 75% to $850. In what would significantly impact Indian IT services firms, companies with more than 50 employees, where 50% or more are on an H-1B or L-1 visa, would have to pay an additional $4,000 or $4,500 for each visa extension.

      The proposal scheduled to be notified in the Federal Register on Friday is not country-specific, but has been brought in view of the abuse of the existing loopholes in the system by China. In all the three categories of foreign students, researchers and journalists, those from China have benefitted the most.

      The details of the proposal have not been published yet, but lawyers expect the administration of President Donald Trump to clear the proposal before the presidential elections in November. If given the go-ahead, it will be implemented immediately without public comment, unlike the case with most other rules.

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