Have you read these stories?

Colonel Santosh Babu awarded with Maha Vir Chakra

Four other soldiers --Naib Subedar Nuduram Soren, Havildar (Gunner) K Palani, Naik Deepak Singh and Sepoy Gurtej Singh-- who also laid ...
The Economic Times
English EditionEnglish Editionहिन्दी
| 26 January, 2021, 12:34 AM IST | E-Paper
Search
+
    SEARCHED FOR:

    TRADE WAR

    Most major economies are shrinking. Not China’s.

    Keeping the virus at bay has been critical to China’s economic success over the past year. While the pandemic ravages other nations, Beijing’s aggressive top-down approach kept the virus from spreading rapidly across the country.

    China 2020 exports up despite coronavirus pandemic; surplus surges to $535 billion

    China's exporters benefited from the relatively early reop...

    China’s new rules could hit US firms and send a message to Biden

    China’s Ministry of Commerce said that the tightening of rules were intended...

    • Speaking just one day after lawmakers finally certified his election victory following the invasion of the US Capitol by supporters of outgoing president Donald Trump, Biden announced he would next week unveil a relief program for the pandemic-ravaged economy.

      USTR’s report points out that: “India’s Digital services taxes is an outlier. It taxes numerous categories of digital services that are not leviable under other DSTs adopted around the world. This brings more US companies within the scope of the DST, and makes the measure significantly more burdensome.”

      The move, first reported by Reuters, is aimed at curbing the threat to Americans posed by Chinese software applications, which have large user bases and access to sensitive data, a senior administration official told Reuters.

      In the latest blow, China's commerce ministry announced wine importers will be forced to pay deposits of as 107-212 percent of the value of their goods at customs, saying the move was in response to "substantive harm caused to the relevant domestic wine industry".

      Biting new Chinese trade tariffs have stoked fears that Australia's virus-weakened economy is being targeted for political retribution and the two countries may be sliding into a shadow trade war.

      The leaders cast aside differences to issue their first joint statement on Friday since 2017, in which they agreed to further deepen regional integration by working toward a massive free trade agreement involving the 21 APEC economies.

      Significantly, Trump’s term has had a notable impact on American attitudes toward China. In time, that could prove the dynamic that affects economic ties in ways the current president has struggled to achieve. And it underscores that Washington’s China policy is forever changed, regardless of who wins the November 3 election.

      A three-person panel had ruled that Washington had not justified why the tariffs imposed after a Section 301 investigation against China were a justifiable exception to its obligations.

      In slapping tariffs on appliances and components imported from China in response to Whirlpool's pleas, the Republican incumbent ultimately hurt American consumers, as prices for washing machines and dryers soared.

      While global trade volumes have inevitably fallen as the world plunged into recession and travel restrictions and social distancing curtailed the movement of people, the economic ties built up by successive waves of globalisation are proving more resilient than some thought.

      With his actions, Trump threatened revenue and product development at China’s most innovative companies. The importance of that is magnified by the timing of his actions, which come as China is upgrading its industries, with many sectors still in need of expertise from abroad to complete the development Xi expects.

      Xi’s agenda to build China into a tech powerhouse makes him more reliant on the very firms likely to appear on any blacklist. In addition, there are also companies Beijing no longer needs — often because their tech has already been pilfered — that have already started reducing reliance on the Chinese market, weakening the real power of any threat.

    Load More...
    x
    The Economic Times